How to get back into reading

Reading is one of those hobbies that many of us wish we could say we had, yet we feel that we simply do not have the time for it. It’s an easy hobby to take up though, and just about everyone can get into it if they can find what works for them and which books intrigue them. Here are some tips for getting back into reading in case you find yourself wishing you were a more avid reader.

How to get back into reading

 

How to get back into reading

 

Create a reading nook.

Reading becomes that much more fun when you have the perfect place to sit back and relax with a good book. So if your home doesn’t yet have such a place, go ahead and create one. Maybe you’ll enjoy reading out on your back porch once you install a comfortable hammock; or maybe all your loft needs is a cozy chair so that you can enjoy reading while listening to the pitter-patter of rain on your roof.  This post has some great tips for creating the perfect reading nook in your home in case you need inspiration.

 

Schedule it in.

You might feel that you simply don’t have time to read for pleasure, but really this probably means that up until now, reading for pleasure hasn’t been a priority for you. Go ahead and make reading a priority by scheduling it into your day. Maybe you’ll spend thirty minutes reading over breakfast, or maybe you’ll reserve 20 minutes after dinner for some reading and relaxation. Find what works for you and stick with it.

 

Take small, active steps.

It’s easy to sit there and say, “I’ll be a reader someday,” only to continue to put it off. If reading is something that you regularly find yourself saying you’ll get around to, start by taking small, active steps that will take you closer to becoming the reader you want your ideal self to be. Purchase a book or two from your reading list. Download an audiobook app and put it in a prominent place on your phone or tablet. Buy a Nook or Kindle if you know that will motivate you.

 

Reread a childhood favorite.

It can help to start by rereading a relatively easy book that you already know you love. Pick out one of your childhood favorites and see what you gain from it the second time around. After all, as Edmund Wilson puts it, “No two persons ever read the same book.”

 

Choose the right book.

This truly is the most important point on this list, and it will make all the difference in your getting back into reading. When it comes to picking out a new book to read, try for something simple in a subject that is interesting to you. Then branch out from there, trying out books from different genres you may not have realized you appreciate. You should also consider seeking recommendations from friends who already share similar favorite books with you.

 

Keep a running ‘books to read’ list.

On a similar note, it’s a good idea to keep a running list handy—be it in a notebook or on your phone—so that you can jot down book recommendations as they come to you.

 

Don’t spend a ton of money on books.

Remember: reading can be virtually free as a hobby when you have a library card, so money need not deter you from becoming an avid reader. You can even check out eBooks from libraries now. And for those times when you do want to purchase a book, you can almost always find a used copy of a book in a used book store or online at Amazon or eBay.

 

Try out digital.

Sure, nothing can quite duplicate the beauty of reading from a physical hardback or paperback book, but that doesn’t mean you should swear yourself off of digital completely. One major advantage to eBooks is their convenience; you can download them on the go and read them right away, without having to wait for anything to come in the mail.

 

Multitask with audiobooks.
If time is a factor that’s keeping you from spending time reading, audiobooks are a solid place to start. The beauty of audiobooks is that you can pair them with a myriad of passive activities that you already spend time doing. If you’re an avid runner, for example, you might download an audiobook onto your phone right before you head out for a run, allowing you to “read” and enjoy the many benefits of running (like those mentioned here) all at the same time. Keep in mind here that since reading (or listening to reading) is an active activity in itself, it’s best not to pair audiobooks with activities that will require your concentration, such as work, writing, budgeting, or sudoku. Other passive activities you might pair an audiobook with include folding laundry, light cleaning, crocheting, or light cooking.

 

 

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